Christmas Decorations ‘Inn’ Trinity Park

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The King’s Daughters Inn at Trinity Park in Durham, NC

The Trinity Park district, near Duke University’s East Campus, is one of the oldest neighborhoods in Durham, North Carolina. The King’s Daughters, a 1920s brick Revival along Buchanan Boulevard in Trinity Park, stands as a bridge between the past and the present. In former days, this two-story structure served as a retirement home for aging, single women—a safe haven made possible through the generosity of the Duke family and the Sheltering Home Circle of Durham, which is a local, non-denominational Christian chapter of the International Order of King’s Sons and Daughters.

With the rise in popularity of large-scale retirement homes in place of the dormitory-style living offered at the King’s Daughters Home, the Sheltering Home Circle of Durham closed its doors in 2006. The white-pillared Colonial beauty reopened in 2009 as the privately owned, 4-star King’s Daughters Inn. The 17-room hotel also serves the Durham community as a place for meetings, weddings and afternoon teas.

Last year around this time, I stopped by the historic Inn hoping that it would be decorated for Christmas. It was! I returned again this year to take pictures of anything I might have missed. (Staff informed me that the Inn is generally decorated in the same manner every year, but I did see a few things I’d overlooked last year.)

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The Inn consists of an eclectic mix of antique furniture and decor–all faithful to the styles of the 1920s. The Christmas decorations blended in beautifully.

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A wing on the second floor bore a 1920s art deco vibe.

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I captured a little more of the wall art this year.

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The Inn is designed to feel like a welcoming home, and as such, I found the doors to all the unoccupied rooms wide open last year. My favorite accommodation was The Trinity Suite, a second-floor getaway overlooking the Trinity Park National Historic District and offering a sun porch (through these french doors) for both relaxing and dining.

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The Christmas tree and poinsettias on the sun porch of the main floor were classic and beautiful. The afternoon light made the scene even more spectacular.

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The King’s Daughters Inn captures and holds for our attention a bygone era tracing back nearly a hundred years. Seeing the halls decked for Christmas added to its charm.


High Time for Afternoon Tea

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Afternoon Christmas Tea at The Duke Inn’s Fairview Dining Room – Durham, North Carolina

I consider tea one of the good gifts God has given us to enjoy. At Christmastime each year, I look forward to a formal afternoon tea—a special celebration I usually indulge in at The Washington Duke Inn, (with some exceptions).

For me, afternoon tea at this time of year is as much about the festive decorations as it is the brew, the savories and the sweets. I’ve written about and photographed The Duke Inn at Christmastime before, so this year I tried to take pictures from new perspectives.

For instance, I snapped the entry hall Christmas tree from a different direction:

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Honestly, it looks pretty much the same from every angle. But this year, I also took a picture of one of the ornaments on the tree—proof of the fine details that might be missed when looking at the whole:

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I believe I spotted a new tree this year. It was quite a hit—several folks stopped to get their pictures taken in front of it:

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I also tried a different flavor of tea. With a bit of hesitation,  I chose the vanilla almond black tea. It was delicious. (Shew!)

After the tiny sandwiches, cheeses, bite-size sweets, a scone smothered in clotted cream and lemon curd, plus two pots of tea (restraint begins tomorrow), I ventured to the other side of the Inn where the Golf Shop is located. I’d never been there before, (Have you seen me play golf? It’s not pretty!), and found Christmas decorations there as well:

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Finally, to prove that I was actually at the Inn, not just stealing pictures off the Interwebs and claiming them as my own, here I am in the lovely sitting room that’s between the dining and the conference center wings.

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(photo credit: B Sullivan)

The Duke Inn never disappoints; and I’ll look forward to next year when once again—Lord willing and the creek don’t rise—it’s high time for afternoon Christmas tea.

Overnight Guests of Grantsville, Maryland

Less than three hours from the big city bustle of Baltimore and Washington DC, Grantsville is home to 1,000 residents and host to visitors seeking country respite.

Travelers are not strangers to this quiet, western Maryland town. In the 1800s, the area was a stagecoach stop along the National Road, a route which created a pass through the Appalachian Mountains to the Ohio Valley westward. In those days, road-weary souls often stayed at The Casselman Inn—a National Register Historic Place that is still open to guests.

Although a new route (US 40) has long since replaced the Old National Road, the original route still passes through Grantsville—and passes by The Casselman Inn.

I had the pleasure of staying at the Inn recently with some of my family—partly in honor of my parents’ 49th wedding anniversary (wow, right?) and partly because of the town’s annual Christmas in the Village. … But I’m getting ahead of myself. First, the Casselman.

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The Casselman Inn is second generation family-owned and operated.

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Come on “inn” and I’ll show you around. (photo credit: Lisa Morrison)

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The front parlor, with its deep window seats, is simple and charming.

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The Inn has been known by many names over the years, including Dorsey’s Inn. The two-room Dorsey Hotel Suite is the crown jewel of the Inn.

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One of the sitting areas in the Dorsey Suite.

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The Dorsey Suite mixes modern conveniences with antique elements.

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The Inn offers two more rooms (such as this one), plus 40 rooms in the motor lodge next door.

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Christmastime is a great time to visit The Casselman Inn. — Grantsville, MD

About a quarter mile down the Pike is Penn Alps Restaurant and Spruce Forest Artisan Village, which hosts the annual Christmas in the Village (now in its 31st year), and features local artisans and their wares. Here are a few photos from this year’s event:

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The circa 1776 Glotfelty House is now a weaver’s studio. (Hurry sundown for the lighting of the luminaries!)

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Looking through the window of Lynn Lais’ pottery studio, some of his lovely work is on display along the windowsill. Nary a year goes by that my parents don’t buy a piece or two from this talented potter. (In fact, that’s my Mom and my sister inside purchasing their pieces.)

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The woodturner’s studio, a circa 1913 schoolhouse, was bedecked in laser lights. Incidentally, I have an exquisite (and functional!) rolling pin from this artisan (Gene Gillespie) that features a multi-colored design of local and exotic woods.

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Spruce Forest Artisan Village with all the luminaries lit.

Walking around the Village can work up an appetite. The adjacent Penn Alps Restaurant provides stick-to-your-ribs comfort food as well as lighter fare for those thus inclined. I wasn’t thus inclined. I savored every bite of my oh-so-tender hot roast beef sandwich, real mashed potatoes and gravy, and almost-as-good-as-Mom’s cup of German vegetable soup.

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I’ll spare you a food photo and show you the Christmas tree in the entry of Penn Alps Restaurant — Grantsville, MD

For the after-dinner sweet tooth, a little further down the Pike is the Hilltop Fruit Market. But don’t let the name fool you—it’s home to Candyland, too!

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The Hilltop Fruit Market, home of the illustrious Candyland, is located along the National Pike in Grantsville, MD. (There are at least two more rows of candy not shown in this picture! Some of it is old fashioned candy or hard to find, or both!)

With visions of sugar plums dancing in our heads, our sleep was sweet and we awoke to the smell of sticky buns baking and bacon crisping. Breakfast at The Cassleman Restaurant was free with our stay. I’m not sure which was more enjoyable, the food or the delightful conversation we had with the locals at a nearby table.

While the bustle of busy-ness has its place, (indeed, those who made our stay memorable were working quite hard to do so!), there is much to be said for slowing down and savoring the moment. This Christmas, I hope you are able to slow down and enjoy the season. (In fact, I hope that I am able to slow down and enjoy the season!) And for those, like Charlie Brown, who find themselves asking, “Isn’t there anyone who can tell me what Christmas is all about?”, this scene along Main Street in Grantsville beautifully depicts the reason for Christmas:

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“For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Savior, who is Christ the Lord.” — Luke 2:11

Spruce Forest Artisan Village

Along the National Road, in an area once known as Little Crossings, Spruce Forest Artisan Village stands as a reminder of the Appalachian farming traditions established in the Allegheny (Maryland) region over two hundred years ago, and serves as a unique locale for artisans to create and display their works.

For years, my parents have attended Spruce Forest’s “Christmas in the Village,” an annual, two-day celebration in early December that showcases the region’s history and provides an opportunity for the six resident artists to interact with visitors who are curious about their various crafts.

This year, I was delighted to find that a visit to my parents’ house coincided with the event. We piled into the car and headed west—through the “cut in the mountain” near Cumberland, past Frostburg, and on to Grantsville, Maryland, the home of Spruce Forest Artisan Village.

It was a rainy evening; but as the locals were quick to say, it’s not uncommon for the event to be blanketed in snow. This blog post won’t do our visit justice, but hopefully it will serve as a glimpse into the careful preservation and extraordinary talent that make the Village a unique, year-round experience—made brighter still by the lights and luminarias of Christmas.

But first, a brief look at the town of Grantsville, Maryland, itself:

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The Casselman Inn, built in 1842, represents the many inns along the Old National Pike, which was a busy, westward passage across the Appalachian Mountains for stagecoaches, covered wagons and drovers (drivers of livestock). The Casselman, now a Western Maryland historic landmark, is still in service today and offers a quaint, country lodging and dining experience.

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An original stone mile marker from the National Road has been restored outside the Casselman Inn. (Grantsville, MD)

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The Casselman River Bridge is over 200 years old and is situated within a 4-acre state park next to Spruce Forest Artisan Village on the eastern side of Grantsville, MD. This bridge is a glimpse into Maryland’s early transportation days—when the National Road, a 620-mile stretch of federal highway that enabled settlers to head west, was in its heyday. During that period, the 80-foot bridge was the longest single span stone arch bridge in the world.

And now, on to the Village!

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Bear Hill School is the studio of resident wood turner Gene Gillespie. Among his works were pieces made from multi-colored, exotic woods. They were gorgeous! — Spruce Forest Artisan Village (Grantsville, MD)

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The Markley House (rear) pre-dates 1775, making it older than the United States. The Hosteler house (front) was built in 1800 and reconstructed at Spruce Forest from parts of the original structure. (Most of the structures in the Village have been moved there, reconstructed and preserved.) — Granstville, MD

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At the time of our visit, the hearth of the Markley House was decorated with wooden figures carved by sculptor Gary Yoder. — Spruce Forest Artisan Village

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A hummingbird carving by resident sculptor Gary Yoder was a work in progress, but was already showing signs of the artist’s skill and attentiveness to detail. Mr. Yoder began learning his craft at age 10 or 11…right there in the Village! — Grantsville, MD

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Authentic elements of the Yoder family can be found inside the House of Yoder at Spruce Forest Artisan Village. Pictured here, near the entryway, is the family crest. The crest dates back to 1350 and contains a pelican, which in ancient times represented involvement in the religious crusades.

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When I entered the Yoder House, I spotted a gentleman tending the fire. In the adjoining room, children were making rustic ornaments as part of the village experience. Upstairs were authentic tools and utensils of times past.  — Spruce Forest Artisan Village

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From the front porch of the Glotfelty House, (where resident weaver Ann Jones works), the Miller House (circa 1835) stands as a symbol of peace (right), while the 1820 Winterberg House (left) serves as a studio for potter Lynn Lais. In the center, in the distance, is the Fernwood Soap shop. — Spruce Forest Artisan Village

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Resident artisan Lynn Lais’ studio was filled with beautiful pottery…and a wooden nativity. I purchased a sturdy mug from him that has been put to good use already. My sister picked out a lovely tray, which Mr. Lais told us is a piece often commissioned by local churches for use as a communion serving tray. — Spruce Forest Artisan Village; Grantsville, MD

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Here’s a flashback to “Christmas in the Village” 2012 (taken by my father): Artisan Lynn Lais works at his potter’s wheel in his studio at Spruce Forest Artisan Village. (Grantsville, MD)

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Amish Bishop Benedict Miller constructed the Miller House in 1835 with his son Joel. Today, the house (which was moved to Spruce Forest in 1986) serves as an Anabaptist Peace Center, with a focus on the early Millers’ walk of faith. Pictured here by the hearth is Miller’s great-great granddaughter, Barbara, who graciously and perfectly posed for this picture. — Spruce Forest Artisan Village (Grantsville, MD)

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Inside the Miller House, an original lantern from an inn along the Old Pike is on display. — Spruce Forest Artisan Village (Grantsville, MD)

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The Compton School (left) is the last and only preserved log school house in Western Maryland. The Village Church (center) is used for music and special events. While visiting the Village, I heard carols coming from inside the 80-year-old structure. The 19th century Eli Miller Shed (right) is the studio of metal sculptor Mike Edelman. — Spruce Forest Artisan Village

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Part of Penn Alps Restaurant, adjacent to Spruce Forest Artisan Village, consists of the original log inn and stagecoach stop along the Old National Road. — Grantsville, MD

Spruce Artisan Village is supported by grants from the Maryland State and Garrett County Arts Councils, as well as by agencies funded by the State of Maryland and the National Endowment for the Arts.


Note: Unfortunately, I somehow overlooked photographing the log cabin of metal smith Doug Salmon.